Dev links: Migration & Replication

Migration

No short-term effect of foreign aid on refugee flows

Overview: “We estimate the causal effects of a country’s aid receipts on both total refugee flows to the world and flows to donor countries.”

Data: “Refugee data on 141 origin countries over the 1976–2013 period [combined] with bilateral Official Development Assistance data”

Identification strategy: “The interaction of donor-government fractionalization and a recipient country’s probability of receiving aid provides a powerful and excludable instrumental variable (IV) when we control for country- and time-fixed effects that capture the levels of the interacted variables.”

Findings: “We find no evidence that aid reduces worldwide refugee outflows or flows to donor countries in the short term. However, we observe long-run effects after four three-year periods, which appear to be driven by lagged positive effects of aid on growth.”

Authors: Dreher, Fuchs, & Langlotz

Living abroad doesn’t change individual “commitment to development”

Overview: “Temporary migration to developing countries might play a role in generating individual commitment to development”

Data: “unique survey [of Mormon missionaries] gathered on Facebook”

Identification strategy: “A natural experiment – the assignment of Mormon missionaries to two-year missions in different world regions”

Findings: “Those assigned to the treatment region (Africa, Asia, Latin America) report greater interest in global development and poverty, but no difference in support for government aid or higher immigration, and no difference in personal international donations, volunteering, or other involvement.” (controlling for relevant vars)

Author: Crawfurd

Replication

Lessons from 3ie replications of development impact evaluations

Overview: “focus is internal replication, which uses the original data from a study to address the same question as that study”

Findings: “In all cases the pure replication components of these studies are generally able to reproduce the results published in the original article. Most of the measurement and estimation analyses confirm the robustness of the original articles or call into question just a subset of the original findings.” + some advice info on how to better translate study findings into policy

Authors: Brown & Wood

Practical advice for conducting quality replications 

Overview: The same authors share practical advice address the challenge “to design a replication plan open to both supporting the original findings and uncovering potential problems.”

Contribution:

1. Tips for diagnostic replication exercises in four groups: validity of assumptions, data transformations, estimation methods, and heterogeneous impacts, plus examples and other resources

2. List of don’ts for how to conduct and report replication research

 

 

Published by

Hannah Blackburn

Hannah Blackburn is a Research Associate at UCSD with JPAL's Payments and Governance Research Group, under Professors Paul Niehaus and Karthik Muralidharan.

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