Weekly Development Links #7

1. 11 years later: Experimental evidence on scaling up education reforms in Kenya (TL;DR gov’t didn’t adopt well)

(This paper was published in Journal of Public Econ 11 years after the project started and 5 years after the first submission!) “New teachers offered a fixed-term contract by an international NGO significantly raised student test scores, while teachers offered identical contracts by the Kenyan government produced zero impact. Observable differences in teacher characteristics explain little of this gap. Instead, data suggests that bureaucratic and political opposition to the contract reform led to implementation delays and a differential interpretation of identical contract terms. Additionally, contract features that produced larger learning gains in both the NGO and government treatment arms were not adopted by the government outside of the experimental sample.”

2. Argument for reporting the “total causal effect”

  • Total causal effect (TCE) = weighted average of the intent to treat effect (ITT) and the spillover effect on the non-treated (SNT)
  • Importance: “RCTs that fail to account for spillovers can produce biased estimates of intention-to-treat effects, while finding meaningful treatment effects but failing to observe deleterious spillovers can lead to misconstrued policy conclusions. Therefore, reporting the TCE is as important as the ITT, if not more important in many cases: if the program caused a bunch of people to escape poverty while others to fall into it, leaving the overall poverty rate unchanged (TCE=0), you’d have to argue much harder to convince your audience that your program is a success because the ITT is large and positive.”
  • Context: Zeitlin and McIntosh recent paper comparing cash and a USAID health + nutrition program in Rwanda. From their blog post: “In our own work the point estimates on village-level impacts are consistent with negative spillovers of the large transfer on some outcomes (they are also consistent with Gikuriro’s village-level health and nutrition trainings having improved health knowledge in the overall population). Cash may look less good as one thinks of welfare impacts on a more broadly defined population. Donors weighing cash-vs-kind decisions will need to decide how much weight to put on non-targeted populations, and to consider the accumulated evidence on external consequences.”

3. Why don’t people work less when you give them cash?

Excellent post by authors of new paper on VoxDev, listing many different mechanisms and also looks at how this changes by type of transfer (e.g. gov’t conditional and unconditional, remittances, etc.)

BONUS: More gender equality = greater differences in preferences on values like altruism, patience or trust (ft. interesting map)

Falk & Hermle 2018

Weekly Development Links #4 – #6

Dev links coming to you weekly from now on!

Week #6: Oct 17

1. Cash transfers increase trust in local gov’t

“How does a locally-managed conditional cash transfer program impact trust in government?”

  • Cash transfers increased trust in leaders and perceptions of leaders’ responsiveness and honesty
  • Beneficiaries reported higher trust in elected leaders but not in appointed bureaucrats
  • Government record-keeping on health and education improved in treatment communities

2. Kinda random: sand dams

Read a WB blogpost on sand dams as a method for increasing water sustainability in arid regions … but that did not explain how the heck you store water in sand, so watched this cool video from Excellent Development, a non-profit that works on sand dam projects.

3. USAID increasingly using “geospatial impact evaluations” ft. MAPS!

Outlines example of a GIE on USAID West Bank/Gaza’s recent $900 million investment in rural infrastructure

Ariel BenYishay, Rachel Trichler, Dan Runfola, and Seth Goodman at Brookings

BONUS: In other geospatial news
LSE blog post on the work of ground-truthing spatial data in Kenya

Week #5: Oct 10

Health Round-Up Edition

1. Dashboards for decisions: Immunization in Nigeria

A new dashboard is being used to improve data on routine immunizations … but doesn’t look like the underlying data quality has been improved. Is this just better access to bad data?

2. Norway vs. Thailand vs. US

A comparative study of health services for undocumented migrants

3. Traditional Midwives in Guatemala

Aljazeera on the complicated relationship between traditional midwives providing missing services and the gov’t trying to provide those services in health centers

BONUS: Visualizing fires + “good”

  • Satellite imagery of crop burning in India in 2017 vs 2018
  • How good is good? 6.92/10. The YouGov visualization on how people rate different descriptors on a 0-10 scale is really interesting if you look at the distributions – lots of agreement on appalling, average (you’d hope there would be clustering around 5!), and perfect. Then, pretty wide variance for quite bad, pretty bad, somewhat bad, great, really good, and very good. Shows how you should cut out generic good/bad descriptions in your writing and use words like appalling or abysmal that are more universally evocative.

Week #4: Oct 3

1. Tanzania outlaws critiques of their data!?

“Consider a simple policy rule: if a government’s statistics cannot be questioned, they shouldn’t be trusted. By that rule, the Bank and Fund would not report Tanzania’s numbers or accept them in determining creditworthiness—and they would immediately withdraw the offer of foreign aid to help Tanzania produce statistics its citizens cannot criticize.”

2. 12 Things We Can Agree On About Global Poverty?

In August, a CGDev post proposed 12 universally agreed-upon truths about global poverty. Do you agree? Are there other truths we should all agree on?

3. Food for thought on two relevant method issues

  • Peter Hull released a two-page brief on controlling for propensity scores instead of using them to match or weight observations
  • Spillover and estimands: “The key issue is that the assumption of no spillovers runs so deep that it is often invoked even prior to the definition of estimands. If you write the “average treatment effect” estimand using potential outcomes notation, as E(Y(1)−Y(0))E(Y(1)−Y(0)), you are already assuming that a unit’s outcomes depend only on its own assignment to treatment and not on how other units are assigned to treatment. The definition of the estimand leaves no space to even describe spillovers.”

BONUS: New head of IMF
Dr. Gita Gopinath takes over.

Weekly Development Links #1

Each Wednesday at IDinsight, one of our tech team members, Akib Khan, posts a few links (mostly from Twitter!) to what he’s been reading in development that week. For the next three weeks, he’s on leave and I am taking over! Thought I should cross-post my selections (also mostly curated from #EconTwitter):

Cash Transfer Bonanza: The details matter
Blattman et al. just released a paper following up on previous 4-year results from a one-time cash transfer of $400, now reporting 9-year results (see first 3 links). To liven up the internal discussion, I’m adding critiques by Ashu Handa (UNC Transfer Project / UNICEF-Innocenti economist and old family friend), who has cautioned against lack of nuance in interpretation of CT study results, esp. around program implementation details like who is distributing grants, the size of the grants, and how frequently they are given – he studies social protection programs giving repeat cash transfers.

Diff-in-diff treatment timing paper… with GIFs!
Andrew Goodman-Bacon (what a name!) has a new paper that all of #EconTwitter is going crazy over. It deals with some methodological issues using diff-in-diff when treatment turns on at different times for different groups, and other scenarios where timing becomes important. Real paper not for the faint hearted, but the Twitter thread has some great GIFs!

African debt to China: reality doesn’t match the hype

Bonus link: Eritrea & Ethiopia border opening party

Look out for: Market impacts of cash transfers

Forthcoming – “General Equilibrium Effects of Cash Transfers,” from Paul NiehausJohannes HaushoferTed Miguel and Michael Walker, answering the question: What are the market impacts of an inflow of ~15% of local GDP?

I have to say I barely understand what’s going on in a “market” … my economic background is very individual- and household-focused.

But understanding the effect of an intervention on a community as a whole, not just on those treated, seems really important. Partially, this is why we look at and consider spillover effects – the effect of an intervention on the neighbors of the treated, who didn’t receive the program themselves.

General equilibrium or market effects investigate a level up from spillover effects and treatment effects – they look at the cumulative impact of the program to the way the economy operates.

I couldn’t explain how one studies a specific market, or what counts as being part of the market, in any clear terms, but I’m still excited for this upcoming paper on the market-level effects of cash transfers, a point that has been debated recently, after evidence of potential negative spillover effects came out.